Rooting Development

in the Palestinian Context

 

About us Blog

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The Project Rooting Development in the Palestinian Context integrates and builds on the developmental challenges, experiences, and popular strategies of various segments of the Palestinian population in the Westbank, the Gaza Strip, Jordan and Lebanon. It derives from the particularities of the Palestinian people and the specific challenges faced as a result of the fragmentation and territorial displacement from decades of Israeli rule.
Through bridging the divide between academic knowledge producers, community-based knowledge and development strategies, the project aims at building alternative knowledge and practices of development that move beyond Eurocentric, Western models.

CDC Zarqa

About us

Founded upon the previous APPEAR project, the Center for Development Studies (CDS) at Birzeit University (BZU) and the Department of Development Studies (DDS) at the University of Vienna continue to deepen and articulate an alternative vision for development.

The project integrates and builds on the developmental challenges, experiences, and popular strategies of various segments of the Palestinian population in their different locations, in order to bridge the divide between academic knowledge producers and community-based knowledge and development strategies.

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Objectives

  1. To work out the Palestinian development agenda Rooting Development by establishing a community of critical knowledge producers (researchers, intellectuals, activists, political actors).
  2. To train new fieldworkers from Palestinian communities in Jordan and Lebanon.
  3. To establish an advanced training programme at CDS.
  4. To build an academic network for a young generation of researchers and fieldworkers from the Palestinian Territories, Jordan, Lebanon and Austria.

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Blog

Helmut Krieger on Austrian public radio OE1 [GER]

Listen to Helmut Krieger speak about the revolts in the Arab World at Ö1, an Austrian public radio station on October 20th at 1pm. The discussion will be in German. In case you miss it, it will be streamed online for a week here.

 

Was blieb vom arabischen Frühling?
Die Suche nach Zukunft in den Trümmern der Gegenwart – sechs Jahre nach dem arabischen Frühling.
Gäste: Dr. Helmut Krieger, Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter und Lehrbeauftragter am Institut für Internationale Entwicklung der Universität Wien und Univ.-Prof. Dr. Cilja Harders, Politikwissenschaftlerin, Leiterin der Arbeitsstelle Politik im Maghreb, Mashreq und Golf an der Freien Universität Berlin.
Moderation: Andreas Obrecht.

 

 

Report: Summer School | Beirut 2017

Download the program of the summer school in English or Arabic

 

What does it mean to change perspectives of knowledge production in/on Palestine and Palestinian communities in their different locations? The 2017 summer school Rooting Research in the Palestinian Context took place in Beirut, from the 22nd to the 28th of July to discuss this question. In light of a rapid transformation of Palestinian society due to political conflict, war and settler colonialism the summer school provided a space for more than 25 people from the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, Lebanon, Jordan and Austria to deeply reflect upon social science knowledge production, its impact, and future developments. Given the rising (Palestinian) critique of research practices by (Western) scholars, journalists and international NGOs, the summer school intended to change perspectives and collectively discuss alternative research approaches. Drawing on first experiences of participants of the field workers and MA graduate training program of the APPEAR project and their trainers, the first two days started with the introduction of their work in progress and the uncertain environments within which they are conducting their research.

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The difficulties of doing field work under conditions of occupation and war became visible once more, as the five participants from the Gaza Strip were not able to get permission to exit their locality due to the siege by the Israeli military. They tried to join some sessions via Skype, but the electricity cuts in Gaza – leaving them with two hours of electricity per day – made it nearly impossible.

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How to navigate field work in Palestinian refugee camps in the region became one of the leading questions throughout the summer school. Professor Sari Hanafi from the American University of Beirut contributed to the event with a very personal account of his reflections on researching conflict and war over the last decades and the problems he faces as a Palestinian sociologist in the Arab world.

The summer school discussed main methodological approaches to produce critical knowledge and the researchers’ scientific, as well as the political responsibility within these processes. The participants collectively developed a practice of self-reflexivity and self-evaluation that should guide them through their research process and debated ethical dilemmas and power relations, informed by positionalities such as class, race, and gender.

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Zeina Yaghi, MenEngage network coordinator at the Resource Center for Gender Equality, ABAAD, presented the differences between traditional research approaches to feminist studies. What distinguishes feminist research is, first, that it is based on the idea to create social change and to transform society, rather than just producing knowledge for the sake of generating data. Secondly, feminist research approaches have to be present during all stages of research – starting with the topic that has to be chosen, the way the data is collected and the question for whom the knowledge is produced.

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Further elaborating on that, Eileen Kuttab from the Institute of Women Studies at Birzeit University reflected upon her long-standing experiences as a feminist researcher trough an audio message. She discussed the questions: What does it mean to work as a feminist scholar and activist under conditions of political conflict, war, and Israeli settler colonialism? What are necessary components of researching feminist perspectives?

Another significant contribution to the summer school was the workshop by Perla Issa from the Institute of Palestine Studies on research in the Palestinian camps between misery profiteering and resistance. She discussed her own experiences in the Palestinian camps in Lebanon as a Palestinian activist and researcher and the power relations as well as ethical dilemmas she was confronted with. Throughout her work, she dealt with and discussed research that was conducted by foreign researchers or international NGOs. She used the term “misery profiteering” to draw attention to how research takes advantage of people’s historical, economic, social and political experiences in the camps.

The last days of the summer school dealt with the question of for whom knowledge should be produced and what the requirements for researching alternative development within the Palestinian society are.

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Helmut Krieger from the Department of Development Studies at the University of Vienna together with his colleague Ayman Abdul Majeed from the Center for Development Studies at Birzeit University and the participants started to disentangle the field of tension of different power relations accompanying social science research.

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How can a researcher maneuver these interrelated power relations? Helmut Krieger mentioned that first of all we have to acknowledge that our research is part of that field of power relations. Often, our research can be used as a tool for various actors to legitimize their power. If we understand these entanglements, we can start to think about how to structure our research differently.

The participants concluded that it would not be enough to collect data, write a summary, give recommendations and leave. They argued that the people must be directly impacted by the research (results) and that their outcomes have to be connected with social initiatives and the youth in the camps. For them, it is crucial for the researcher to be attached to the people and that knowledge should be authorized by the communities in which we are engaged. The people themselves will decide if their research contributes to social transformations, not the researchers.

The general structure of the summer school included joint activities such as a trip to the northern city of Jbeil and the public panel discussion Critical Knowledge Production in Imperial Times as well as a visit to the refugee camps Burj Barajneh and Shatila close to Beirut.

Burj Baraineh camp ©Rottenschlager

The summer school also provided a space to reflect upon the APPEAR project, to evaluate the work that has been done so far as well as perspectives of the future

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@Moussawat
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Event report: Film Screening – Whose Peace will it be?

On the 26th of June the Vienna based research cluster of the APPEAR project Rooting Development in the Palestinian Context organised a screening of the film “Who’s peace will it be?” The 2015 film by Belgian director Luc Pien discusses the history and current reality of war-torn Iraq. After the screening, followed a discussion about the film and recent developments in Iraq. Helmut Krieger, researcher and lecturer at the University of Vienna and coordinator of the APPEAR project in Vienna together with Tyma Kraitt, a Vienna based journalist with a focus on the Near and Middle East, provided insightful and inspiring comments. Important aspects of their talks and the discussions were the challenge to remember what influence decades of war and sanctions had on the Iraqi society, the crucial role oil played in the formation and trajectory of Iraq, and future scenarios for the state, as the religious and ethnic divide in combination with geopolitical factors and confrontations paint a dim future for Iraq and the entire region. Nevertheless, shimmers of hope were identified in civil society initiatives and social movements from below which, against all odds, continuously struggle for social rights and against sectarian politics. The event was well attended by interested students and colleagues from the University of Vienna and beyond. Many showed interest in future events by the research cluster.
 
 

Jour Fixe Event in Vienna: Film screening – Who’s peace will it be?

Film screening and discussion on the current situation in Iraq
As war is intensifying in Syria and Iraq, life has become unbearable in both countries. Hundreds of thousands of refugees seek safety in neighbouring countries and Europe. Many drown attempting to cross the Mediterranean. Drawing on voices other than those we hear, see and read daily in the media, “Whose peace will it be?” traces the origins and causes of the present disaster. The documentary weaves memories of the past through experiences of the present to create a mosaic within which the pathway to peace might be discerned. It provides an impetus to think differently about the future for Iraqi and Middle Eastern people after the state, the civil and cultural infrastructure has been destroyed. (http://www.lightintimetocome.org/)

After the film screening there will be a discussion on the current political developments in Iraq, with a special focus on the ongoing battle over Mosul.
Discussants | Tyma Kraitt, Helmut Krieger

Moderation | Ramin Taghian Language: English/German
Tyma Kraitt is a free journalist and an expert on Iraq and Syria.
Helmut Krieger is researcher and lecturer at the Department of Development Studies with a special focus on transformation processes and social movements in the Arabic- Islamic World.

The event is organized by the interdisciplinary research cluster Conflict and Development in Palestine that is based at the Department of Development Studies at the University of Vienna. The research cluster is one of four components of the APPEAR project Rooting Development in the Palestinian Context.

The Jour fixe is an open discussion format for colleagues to develop critical questions and new perspectives on the Arab World.
Date & Time | Monday 26th June 2017, 6 p.m.
Location | Department of African Studies, seminar room 3, Spitalgasse 2, 1090 Vienna

 

Download the poster in English and German

 

New article on our project out now!

Read a new article on our project published in the new issue of Frauensolidarität (in German):
 
“Freiheit und Gerechtigkeit in Verbindung mit Entwicklung –
Emanzipatorische Wissensproduktion im Kontext Palästina
 
by Klaudia Rottenschlager
 
Frauensolidarität No.140: Flucht und Migration